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Haitian Creole Subtitling Services

Haitian Creole Subtitling Services

Find out why we're the most talked about Haitian Creole subtitling company in the UK

Send your project viral with the help of the UK’s leading Haitian Creole subtitling company.

Add Haitian Creole subtitles to a variety of content, including business presentations, corporate and educational videos, e-learning courses, feature films, promo videos and many more.

 

Whether you have one video or many, we can help. You’ll get an all-inclusive, cost-effective and hassle-free subtitling solution. We work with a global network of professional subtitlers, but you deal directly with us and can trust us to deliver your project to your specifications.

 

Our in-house subtitlers and project managers are equipped with industry-standard subtitling software and will thoroughly check all subtitle files before delivery, so you don’t need to worry.

 

With more than 15 years’ experience in the subtitling field you are in safe hands. Rest assured you’ll receive accurately timed and perfectly translated Haitian Creole subtitles!

 

Whether you are a corporate client or a translation or production company, we’ll adapt to your needs so that you can add video translation services to your portfolio of services.

 

We are only a call or email away or, if you prefer, you can visit our get-a-quote page to discuss your subtitling project in detail. You’ll receive spot-on Haitian Creole subtitles to suit your project and needs.

Golocalise are our supplier of choice for all our subtitling and transcription needs. After years of hassle trying to do it all in-house we have found their service to be a revelation in terms of speed, flexibility and costs. Their team is extremely responsive and can always turnaround requests, in any language, within our short deadlines. We can confidently rely on them to provide any deliverables without ever worrying about the accuracy of the subtitling.

Adam Ruddick
Head of Production at Casual Films

The benefits of using GoLocalise as your subtitling service provider

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The Subtitling Process In A Nutshell

1. Receipt of the final video

This can generally be in any format, as long as the subtitling provider has the facilities for converting the video into the format supported by their subtitling software. It is always recommended to double check with the provider whether they need to receive the video in a specific format.

2. English Template

Usually undertaken if translation into more than one language is required.

3. Translation

Sending the English template to the linguist for translation.

4. Receipt of translated subtitles

The subtitle file is imported onto the subtitling software in order to perform final quality checks and ensure that subtitles do not exceed reading speeds or run over more than two lines.

5. Quality check

If the results of the quality checks are not satisfactory, the subtitle file will be sent back to the 
translator and necessary amends will be requested.

6. Final check and send

Sending the English template to the linguist for translation.

7. Client approval

If burning-in is also required, the client needs to approve the translation. If any 
changes to the translation are requested, these need to be communicated to the subtitler and will be implemented if they do not affect readings speeds, maximum characters per line etc. If they cannot be implemented, this will be communicated to the client and alternatives will be suggested.

8. Burning-in

Once all changes have been implemented and the final version of the translation is ready, the burning-in process (if requested) will take place.

9. It's ready

Your final video is ready, and will be delivered to you via WeTransfer, Hightail, Dropbox, FTP or another file-transfer service of your choice.

Why Choose Us?

You deserve the best! Leave your project to the experts at GoLocalise so that you can relax and be assured of getting top-notch results.

Every single detail will be analysed, studied and looked after so that you do not need to worry. Some would say it’s not too classy to blow our own trumpet… but we just like to point out two very important details.

We have achieved ISO 9001 Quality Management certification in recognition of our consistent performance and high standards, and ISO 14001 Environmental Management because we care about our planet! And if you are still curious and want to know more about us, why not have a look at our studio page.

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Professional Subtitling Formats

Whether you want English subtitles or foreign language subtitles, GoLocalise is the answer!

We can adapt and time your own translation into subtitle format or create foreign language subtitles in any language from scratch, including English subtitles and SDH (Subtitling for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing).

You can choose to receive your subtitles in over 40 formats, including: AQT, ASC, ASS, CIP, DAR, DAS, DAT, DKS, FDX, FPC, HTML, JS, JSS, LRC, MPL, MTL, OVR, PAC, PAN, PJS, RT, RTF, S2K, SAMI, SBT, SBV, SCC, SIF, SMI, SON, SRF, SRT, SSA, SST, SSTS, STL, STL, STP, SUB, TTS, TXT, USF, VKT, VSF, VTT, XML and ZEG.

We work with you so that you get the perfect subtitles to suit your needs.

Open captions

Ready-to-use videos with burnt-in subtitles, ready to be uploaded to your website. You can customise the style and look of the subtitles (font, size, colour, positioning, etc.).

Closed captions

Subtitles that can be switched on and off in multiple languages. These can easily be uploaded to your YouTube or Vimeo videos, DVD or Blu-Ray.

Caption & Graphic Editing

When localising and translating videos (whether you choose subtitling or voice over), you’ll find that often there are several elements that need to be localised. These elements can be on-screen graphics, text and/or captions.

Our expert project managers will review the video or project file and advise which elements would be best subtitled or graphically edited. If you do not have the project files, worry not; one of our expert editors will be able to re-create the graphics, captions and titles of your video.

Our expert editors work with a multitude of software: to localise graphics we use Photoshop or Illustrator; and After Effects and Final Cut Pro to create motion graphics and visual effects.

Once all elements are in the video, and the graphic elements have been created and localised, we can then rebuild the video and export it to whichever format and codec you need.

We’ll prepare your video project for any platform, including PAL, NTSC, VOD, the Internet, smartphones, game consoles, mp3 players and tablets.

With our facilities and highly skilled operators, your videos are in safe hands!

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Haitian Creole

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Working alongside translation & production companies

Having a strong audiovisual department on your side makes all the difference!

With GoLocalise you get an experienced and motivated team of professionals that work regularly alongside translation and production companies.

 

We understand the technical requirements necessary to produce perfect foreign language and English voice overs.

 

Our project managers will assist you along the way and we’ll break down the process and present it to you without the big words or technical industry jargon, so you don’t need to worry about the technical aspects and can simply concentrate on growing your business.

 

By working with GoLocalise you’ll be able to offer additional services, i.e., voice oversubtitling and translation to your clients, with a partner who will deliver and on whom you can truly rely.

 

When working with translation companies we provide easy-to-follow guidelines so that you can provide your own translations for us to “convert” into subtitles, or voice over your translated scripts.

 

Or if you prefer, we can take the entire project off your hands and keep things simple for you – it’s your call!

 

We’re equally used to working with production companies, so we can deliver your translations or subtitles in any language and format of your choice – either burning-in the subtitles onto the video for you, or supplying you with XML or PNG files for you to do yourself – Adobe After Effects and Final Cut Pro ready files.

Reach your target market

Don’t leave your important communication to chance. Make sure your message is clearly understood by your audience and choose GoLocalise for your next voice over project.

 

We have thousands of passionate and professional voice over artists ready to work with you (meet them on the blog).

 

No matter the type of voice you are looking for, we’ll either have it in our books or find it and source it for you.

 

We’ll organise a casting and ensure you get the perfect voice to suit your needs.

 

You will also benefit from having your own dedicated project manager – a single point of contact – to guide you through your project, answer any questions you may have and make things a whole lot easier.

Meet your dedicated project manager

Your project will be in the safe hands of one of our multilingual project managers.

 

They will guide you through every step and ensure you understand the process. Our industry has a tendency to use lots of technical jargon but your dedicated project manager will be on-hand to untangle the mess and explain all you need to know to ensure you only pay for what you need.

 

If you need help in choosing the right voice over talent to deliver your message then just ask your project manager.

 

From booking our voice over recording studios to ensuring you project is delivered on time in your chosen media, relax and let your experienced project manager take care of everything.

 

You will receive unparalleled attention to detail and customer focus at competitive prices. You’ll wish everything was as easy as a GoLocalise voice over!

Your most discerning customers will thank you for choosing our modern state-of-the-art recording studios.

 

Every detail has been carefully thought through for your comfort, leaving you to simply focus on what matters most – the voice over session.

 

Your recordings will sound beautiful and crystal clear thanks to our high-end studio sound-proofing and audio equipment, i.e. ProTools HD and Neumann microphones.

 

Maximise your budget by reducing the need for retakes with the help of our experienced in-house sound engineers who will professionally capture and edit your audio.

 

And for those recordings in languages which neither you nor your client speak, we’ll bring a qualified pro to your session to add that essential ingredient. To make you feel right at home, we provide high-speed Wi-Fi Internet and air-con is available.

 

And last but not least, we have the biggest cookie jar you’ve ever seen, that’ll make your custom brew taste even sweeter!

A Brief History Of Haitian Creole

Haitian Creole commonly referred to as simply Creole, or Kreyòl in the Creole language, is a French-based creole language spoken by 10–12 million people worldwide, and is one of the two official languages of Haiti (the other being French), where it is the native language of the vast majority of the population. Northern, Central, and Southern dialects are the three main dialects of Haitian Creole. The Northern dialect is predominantly spoken in Cap-Haïtien, Central is spoken in Port-au-Prince, and Southern in the Cayes area.

The language emerged from contact between French settlers and enslaved Africans during the Atlantic slave trade in the French colony of Saint-Domingue (now Haiti) in the 17th and 18th centuries. Although its vocabulary largely derives from 18th-century French, its grammar is that of a West African Volta-Congo language branch, particularly the Fongbe and Igbo languages. It also has influences from Spanish, English, Portuguese, Taino, and other West African languages. It is not mutually intelligible with standard French, and has its own distinctive grammar. Haitians are the largest community in the world speaking a modern creole language, according to some sources. However, this is disputable, as Nigerian Pidgin, an English-based Creole language, is attested by some sources to have a larger number of speakers than that of Haitian Creole and other French-based Creole languages, particularly if non-native speakers are included.

The usage of, and education in, Haitian Creole has been contentious since at least the 19th century. Some Haitians view French as a legacy of colonialism, while Creole has been maligned by francophones as a miseducated person’s French. Until the late 20th century, Haitian presidents spoke only standard French to their fellow citizens, and until the 21st century, all instruction at Haitian elementary schools was in modern standard French, a second language to most of their students.

Haitian Creole is also spoken in regions that have received migration from Haiti, including other Caribbean islands, French Guiana, Martinique, France, Canada (particularly Quebec) and the United States (including the U.S. state of Louisiana). It is related to Antillean Creole, spoken in the Lesser Antilles, and to other French-based creole languages.

The word creole comes from the Portuguese term crioulo, which means “a person raised in one’s house”, from the Latin creare, which means “to create, make, bring forth, produce, beget”. In the New World, the term originally referred to Europeans born and raised in overseas colonies (as opposed to the European-born peninsulares). To be “as rich as a Creole” at one time was a popular saying boasted in Paris during the colonial years of Saint-Domingue, for being the most lucrative colony in the world. The noun Creole eventually came to denote mixed-race Creole peoples and their mixed Creole languages.

Haitian Creole contains elements from both the Romance group of Indo-European languages through its superstrate, French, as well as influences from African languages. There are many theories on the formation of the Haitian Creole language.

One theory estimates that Haitian Creole developed between 1680 and 1740. During the 17th century, French and Spanish colonizers produced tobacco, cotton, and sugar cane on the island. Throughout this period, the population was made of roughly equal numbers of engagés (white workers), gens de couleur libres (free people of colour) and slaves. The economy shifted more decisively into sugar production about 1690, just before the French colony of Saint-Domingue was officially recognized in 1697. The sugar crops needed a much larger labor force, which led to an increase in slave trafficking . In the 18th century an estimated 800,000 West Africans were enslaved and brought to Saint-Domingue. As the slave population increased, the proportion of French-speaking colonists decreased.

Many African slaves in the colony had come from Niger-Congo-speaking territory, and particularly speakers of Kwa languages, such as Gbe from West Africa and the Central Tano languages, and Bantu languages from Central Africa. Singler suggests that the number of Bantu speakers decreased while the number of Kwa speakers increased, with Gbe being the most dominant group. The first fifty years of Saint‑Domingue’s sugar boom coincided with emergent Gbe predominance in the French Caribbean. In the interval during which Singler hypothesizes the language evolved, the Gbe population was around 50% of the kidnapped enslaved population.

Classical French (français classique) and langues d’oïl (Norman, Poitevin and Saintongeais dialects, Gallo and Picard) were spoken during the 17th and 18th centuries in Saint‑Domingue, as well as in New France and French West Africa. Slaves lacked a common means of communication and as a result would try to learn French to communicate with one another, though most were denied a formal education. With the constant trafficking and enslavement of Africans, the language became increasingly distinct from French. The language was also picked up by other members of the community and became used by the majority of those born in what is now Haiti.

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