English Transcription Services

English Transcription Services

GoLocalise offers transcription services for audio and video files in over 100 languages as well as English.

100% Precise and Human Generated English Transcription Services!

GoLocalise offers English transcription services for audio and video files for business and individual purposes. Our expert team of transcribers will create a text version of your video or audio file, and we can also translate and/or voice over your transcript.

 

We are your reliable English transcription company!

What Is Transcription?

No, this isn’t a trick question and you might be surprised how many people get this wrong. In simple terms, transcription is the process of listening to audiovisual content and writing down what is heard.

 

Seems simple enough, so what exactly is the part that confuses people?

We used GoLocalise to voice several of our films in Vietnamese. The service was friendly and professional. Being able to attend the recording sessions gave me confidence; the sound engineer had taken a lot of time to familiarise himself with our films and scripts, and the voice talents were incredibly competent and good at adapting to any changes in the scripts as we recorded. The whole process was incredibly smooth and I felt in safe hands.

Josie Gallo
Content Co-ordinator at Medical Aid Films

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Understanding The Difference Between Transcription and Translation

Many people confuse transcription with translation.

 

If you need a text version of your audiovisual content in a language which is different to the original language of your source material then you need translation (which, by the way, we can also help you with).

 

If you’re simply in need of a written transcript in the same language as your original audiovisual materials, that is transcription and you’re in the right place.

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What Do Our English Audio and Video Transcription Services Include?

Verbatim Transcriptions

A voice to text transcription method, this records all interjections, signs of emotions (coughs, sighs, chuckles, etc.), false starts and shifts in thought processes. This type of transcription is often useful if you're going to use your transcript as an aid to help during a subsequent editing process, but if you want something more like a finished product you might benefit more from a different type of transcription.

Word-for-word transcription

As with verbatim transcriptions, this style will capture the text as it is spoken without making any attempts to correct grammar or restructure sentences for better clarity. However, all filler words will be removed.

Grammatically correct transcriptions

In this type of transcription, filler words are eliminated, false starts and self-corrected words aren't included, and grammar and mispronounced words are corrected. The resultant document will read less like conversational speech and more like a properly structured text. This style is great for publishing as an article or for any other purpose that's designed to be public-facing.

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What Are the Benefits of Transcribing Your English Audio or Video Content with GoLocalise?

The answer to that is that many people confuse transcription with translation. If you need a text version of your audiovisual content in a language which is different to the original language of your source material then you need translation (which, by the way, we can also help you with).

 

If you’re simply in need of a written transcript in the same language as your original audiovisual materials, that is a transcription service and you’re in the right place.

It makes your audiovisual content more easily discoverable

Let's take a podcast, for example. If you're able to make a text version of your audio content available, this enables search engines such as Google to include your content in search results much more easily. People searching online for phrases related to your subject matter will therefore be much more likely to encounter your materials during their search, thus increasing traffic to your site and increasing your potential reach overall.

The likelihood of your content being quoted in other publications will increase

Any journalist, blogger or anybody else who regularly writes articles will require some form of written quote or citation in order to support the argument or point of view that they're trying to convey with their article. When deciding what supporting arguments to use for their piece and choosing between two equally credible sources of audiovisual information – one already transcribed and ready to quote - that writer is naturally going to choose the pre-transcribed version.

And There are Many More Reasons

Creating your audiovisual content, whether that's a podcast or a video of some kind, is often an incredibly time-consuming and expensive process. So why use it for only one purpose? You can use a transcription to repurpose your materials into a blog or social media post, to drive traffic to your website, to use as a teaser to bring people to a full-length podcast, and many more uses too.

Making Your Content accessible to a Wider Range of People

Of course, the very best example of this would be people who are deaf or have other hearing impairments. Without a written transcript of your audio your content will simply not be accessible to this group of individuals.

Connecting With You People Who Speak Other Languages

Did you know that in the United Kingdom there are almost 550,000 speakers of Polish as their first language, plus approximately an additional one million speakers of various languages from India, such as Punjabi, Gujarati, Bengali and Urdu? For many people, one of the toughest things as a speaker of a second language is following along with audio in that second language - especially if the content is particularly complex or colloquial in nature. For these people it's often an invaluable resource to be able to follow along with a written version of audiovisual content.

Can I Use a Transcription As Subtitles?

Yes, and no. GoLocalise specialises in anything audiovisual so of course if you’re in need of a full subtitling service we can absolutely help with that too, and in fact transcription is an integral part of the process when creating a same-language subtitle file.

The main difference here would be that subtitling also requires very precise technological know-how so that the resultant subtitles follow subtitling conventions and don’t prove to be distracting to the viewer.

A transcription by default won’t necessarily follow these guidelines and is better suited for other purposes, such as the ones listed above.

Tap Into Our High Quality English Transcription Services Now!

So, whatever your reason for transcribing your audio or video content in English, we’re happy to help.

Whether it’s to make your English podcast more accessible to people with hearing impairments, for use as a starting point for a video localisation project, or for any other reason, our experience in these fields has made us the top choice for clients all over the world who want to get more out of their audiovisual content.

Our transcriptionists specialise transcribing English content, but also other audiovisual content from many other languages, consistently ensuring high-quality results. 

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You deserve the best!

Leave your project to the experts at GoLocalise so that you can relax and be assured of getting top-notch results

Every single detail will be analysed, studied and looked after so that you do not need to worry.

 

Some would say it’s not too classy to blow our own trumpet… but we just like to point out two very important details.

 

We have achieved ISO 9001 Quality Management certification in recognition of our consistent performance and high standards, and ISO 14001 Environmental Management because we care about our planet!

 

And if you are still curious and want to know more about us, why not have a look at our studio page.

Why Choose Us?

Learn more about Transcription Services

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Trust to deliver by the World Top Brands.

Reach your target market

Don’t leave your important communication to chance. Make sure your message is clearly understood by your audience and choose GoLocalise for your next voice over project. Check out our latest case studies.

 

We have thousands of passionate and professional voice over artists ready to work with you. Meet some of them in our blog stories.

 

No matter the type of voice you are looking for, we’ll either have it in our books or find it and source it for you. We’ll organise a casting and ensure you get the perfect voice to suit your needs.

 

You will also benefit from having your own dedicated project manager – a single point of contact – to guide you through your project, answer any questions you may have and make things a whole lot easier.

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Meet your dedicated project manager

Your project will be in the safe hands of one of our multilingual project managers. They will guide you through every step and ensure you understand the process.

 

Our industry has a tendency to use lots of technical jargon but your dedicated project manager will be on-hand to untangle the mess and explain all you need to know to ensure you only pay for what you need.

 

If you need help in choosing the right voice over talent to deliver your message then just ask your project manager.

 

From booking our voice over recording studios to ensuring you project is delivered on time in your chosen media, relax and let your experienced project manager take care of everything.

 

You will receive unparalleled attention to detail and customer focus at competitive prices. You’ll wish everything was as easy as a GoLocalise voice over agency!

Perfect voice over recording studios

Your most discerning customers will thank you for choosing our modern state-of-the-art recording studios. Every detail has been carefully thought through for your comfort, leaving you to simply focus on what matters most – the voice over session.

 

Your recordings will sound beautiful and crystal clear thanks to our high-end studio sound-proofing and audio equipment, i.e. ProTools HD and Neumann microphones.

 

Maximise your budget by reducing the need for retakes with the help of our experienced in-house sound engineers who will professionally capture and edit your audio.

 

And for those recordings in languages which neither you nor your client speak, we’ll bring a qualified pro to your session to add that essential ingredient.

 

To make you feel right at home, we provide high-speed Wi-Fi Internet and air-con is available. And last but not least, we have the biggest cookie jar you’ve ever seen, that’ll make your custom brew taste even sweeter!

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What our happy customers say

We used GoLocalise to voice several of our films in Vietnamese. The service was friendly and professional. Being able to attend the recording sessions gave me confidence; the sound engineer had taken a lot of time to familiarise himself with our films and scripts, and the voice talents were incredibly competent and good at adapting to any changes in the scripts as we recorded. The whole process was incredibly smooth and I felt in safe hands.

Josie Gallo

Content Co-ordinator at Medical Aid Films

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We have used GoLocalise on a regular basis for projects in a number of languages. The service we receive is great. The team is always friendly and professional. The voiceovers we receive are of a very high quality and the turnaround is extremely quick. We are very happy to recommend GoLocalise to other businesses.

Jo Samuel

Animator at Pixel Circus

They’re reliable, adaptive and obsessed with quality. And while you can never be 100% guaranteed of perfection, you can be sure GoLocalise will go the extra mile to get it right every time. Whether that’s hiring extra resources, hopping on multiple calls or even changing their internal processes, they’ll do what it takes. We’ve worked with them now for over to 5 years and we are truly thankful to have such a strong localisation partner for our business.

Lucas Cole

Sales and Marketing Director at Epipheo

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GoLocalise has been Atlas’s sole provider of translation and foreign voiceover services since 2011. Their friendly and efficient team have localised a range of technical and behavioural projects and in a variety of multimedia formats. Atlas considers GoLocalise to be our localisation partner; trusted to consistently deliver on time and to a high standard.

Thomas Kennedy

Designer at Atlas Knowledge

GoLocalise are a joy to work with. Nothing is too much trouble for them and we always appreciate their good advice, flexibility, fairness and professionalism. I would highly recommend them for any project.

Stefanie Smith

Producer at Education First

I really enjoy working with GoLocalise. The team is very nice and flexible, and they deliver subtitles of high quality, both from a technical and linguistic point of view. Subtitling is a stress-free matter when it is in their hands, I would definitely recommend their services.

Marion Hirst

Translation Project Manager at Language Wire

Golocalise are our supplier of choice for all our subtitling and transcription needs. After years of hassle trying to do it all in-house we have found their service to be a revelation in terms of speed, flexibility and costs. Their team is extremely responsive and can always turnaround requests, in any language, within our short deadlines. We can confidently rely on them to provide any deliverables without ever worrying about the accuracy of the subtitling.

Adam Ruddick

Head of Production at Casual Films

It was a pleasure to work with David and the team at GoLocalise. David gave me lots of help and advice, guiding me through my first subtitling project. He really knows his stuff! The experience was completely pain-free. I would not hesitate to recommend GoLocalise – outstanding work at a good price.

Kerry Gillies

Director at Synergy Language Services

I really love working with GoLocalise. Their subtitling department takes care of everything and they always deliver the best quality files. I’m also very happy that they’re willing, and capable, to work with all kinds of requests, and are always happy to help me and make the process better. The team is also so very helpful, and very nice to work with. I always recommend their services to everybody.

Patricia Leon-Fedorko

Account Specialist at Advanced Language

We’ve worked with the GoLocalise team on countless video projects and have always had the same consistent, great experience. Not only are they responsive and quick on turnaround, I can always trust the VO will be done right – they are always 100% clear with communication and ensure their talent is prepared to record by asking necessary questions upfront before recording. Highly recommended and will definitely work with them on future projects.

Jonathan Lapps

Account Manager at Epipheo

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A Brief History Of English

British English is the English language as spoken and written in Great Britain or, more broadly, throughout the British Isles.

Written English

Slight regional variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland and Northern Ireland, whereas little is predominant elsewhere.

Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English.

Spoken English

The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken, so a uniform concept of British English is more difficult to apply to the spoken language.

According to Tom McArthur in the Oxford Guide to World English, British English shares “all the ambiguities and tensions in the word British and as a result can be used and interpreted in two ways, more broadly or more narrowly, within a range of blurring and ambiguity.”

When distinguished from American English, the term “British English” is sometimes used broadly as a synonym for “Commonwealth English”, the general dialect of English spoken amongst the former British colonies exclusive of the particular regionalisms of, for example, Australian English or Canadian English.

British English Origin

English is a West Germanic language that originated from the Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Britain by Germanic settlers from various parts of what is now northwest Germany and the northern Netherlands.

The resident population at this time was generally speaking Common Brittonic—the insular variety of continental Celtic, which was influenced by the Roman occupation.

This group of languages (Welsh, Cornish, Cumbric) cohabited alongside English into the modern period, but due to their remoteness from the Germanic languages, influence on English was notably limited.

However, the degree of influence remains debated, and it has recently been argued that its grammatical influence accounts for the substantial innovations noted between English and the other West Germanic languages.

Initially, Old English was a diverse group of dialects, reflecting the varied origins of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms of England. One of these dialects, Late West Saxon, eventually came to dominate.

The original Old English language was then influenced by two waves of invasion: the first was by speakers of the Scandinavian branch of the Germanic family, who conquered and colonised parts of Britain in the 8th and 9th centuries; the second was the Normans in the 11th century, who spoke Old Norman and ultimately developed an English variety of this called Anglo-Norman.

These two invasions caused English to become “mixed” to some degree (though it was never a truly mixed language in the strictest sense of the word; mixed languages arise from the cohabitation of speakers of different languages, who develop a hybrid tongue for basic communication).

The more idiomatic, concrete and descriptive English is, the more it is from Anglo-Saxon origins. The more intellectual and abstract English is, the more it contains Latin and French influences (e.g. pig is the animal bred by the occupied Anglo-Saxons and pork is the animal eaten by the occupying Normans).

Cohabitation with the Scandinavians resulted in a significant grammatical simplification and lexical enrichment of the Anglo-Frisian core of English; the later Norman occupation led to the grafting onto that Germanic core of a more elaborate layer of words from the Romance branch of the European languages.

This Norman influence entered English largely through the courts and government. Thus, English developed into a “borrowing” language of great flexibility and with a huge vocabulary.

The major divisions are normally classified as English English (or English as spoken in England, which encompasses Southern English dialects, West Country dialects, East and West Midlands English dialects and Northern English dialects), Welsh English (not to be confused with the Welsh language), Irish English and Scottish English (not to be confused with the Scots language).

The various British dialects also differ in the words that they have borrowed from other languages. Following its last major survey of English Dialects (1949–1950), the University of Leeds has started work on a new project. In May 2007 the Arts and Humanities Research Council awarded a grant to a team led by Sally Johnson, Professor of Linguistics and Phonetics at Leeds University, to study British regional dialects.

Johnson’s team are sifting through a large collection of examples of regional slang words and phrases turned up by the “Voices project” run by the BBC, in which they invited the public to send in examples of English still spoken throughout the country.

The BBC Voices project also collected hundreds of news articles about how the British speak English from swearing through to items on language schools.

This information will also be collated and analysed by Johnson’s team both for content and for where it was reported. “Perhaps the most remarkable finding in the Voices study is that the English language is as diverse as ever, despite our increased mobility and constant exposure to other accents and dialects through TV and radio”.

English Received Pronuntiation (RP)

The form of English most commonly associated with the upper class in the southern counties of England is called Received Pronunciation (RP). It derives from a mixture of the Midland and Southern dialects spoken in London in the early modern period and is frequently used as a model for teaching English to foreign learners.

Although speakers from elsewhere in England may not speak with an RP accent, it is now a class dialect more than a local dialect. It may also be referred to as “the Queen’s (or King’s) English“, “Public School English”, “Posh” or “BBC English” as this was originally the form of English used on radio and television, although a wider variety of accents can be heard these days. About 2% of Britons speak RP, and it has evolved quite markedly over the last 40 years.

Cockney and other accents

In the South East there are significantly different accents; the Cockney accent spoken by some East Londoners is strikingly different from RP. The Cockney rhyming slang can be (and was initially intended to be) difficult for outsiders to understand, although the extent of its use is often somewhat exaggerated.

Estuary English has been gaining prominence in recent decades: it has some features of RP and some of Cockney. In London itself, the broad local accent is still changing, partly influenced by Caribbean speech.

Immigrants to the UK in recent decades have brought many more languages to the country. Surveys started in 1979 by the Inner London Education Authority discovered over 100 languages being spoken domestically by the families of the inner city’s schoolchildren. As a result, Londoners speak with a mixture of accents, depending on ethnicity, neighbourhood, class, age, upbringing, and sundry other factors.

Since the mass internal immigration to Northamptonshire in the 1940s and its position between several major accent regions, it has become a source of various accent developments. In Northampton the older accent has been influenced by overspill Londoners.

There is an accent known locally as the Kettering accent, which is a transitional accent between the East Midlands and East Anglian. It is the last southern midland accent to use the broad “a” in words like bath/grass (i.e. barth/grarss). Conversely crass/plastic use a slender “a”.

A few miles northwest in Leicestershire the slender “a” becomes more widespread generally. In the town of Corby, five miles (8 km) north, one can find Corbyite, which unlike the Kettering accent, is largely influenced by the West Scottish accent.

In addition, most British people can to some degree temporarily “swing” their accent towards a more neutral form of English at will, to reduce difficulty where very different accents are involved, or when speaking to foreigners.

As with English around the world, the English language as used in the United Kingdom is governed by convention rather than formal code: there is no body equivalent to the Académie française or the Real Academia Española.

Dictionaries (for example, Oxford English Dictionary, Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, Chambers Dictionary, Collins Dictionary) record usage rather than attempting to prescribe it. In addition, vocabulary and usage change with time: words are freely borrowed from other languages and other strains of English, and neologisms are frequent.

For historical reasons dating back to the rise of London in the 9th century, the form of language spoken in London and the East Midlands became standard English within the Court, and ultimately became the basis for generally accepted use in the law, government, literature and education in Britain.

To a considerable extent, modern British spelling was standardised in Samuel Johnson’s A Dictionary of the English Language (1755), although previous writers had also played a significant role in this and much has changed since 1755. Scotland, which underwent parliamentary union with England only in 1707, still has a few independent standards, especially within its separate legal system.

Since the early 20th century, British authors have produced numerous books intended as guides to English grammar and usage, a few of which have achieved sufficient acclaim to have remained in print for long periods and to have been reissued in new editions after some decades.

These include, most notably of all, Fowler’s Modern English Usage and The Complete Plain Words by Sir Ernest Gowers. Detailed guidance on many aspects of writing British English for publication is included in style guides issued by various publishers including The Times newspaper, the Oxford University Press and the Cambridge University Press.

The Oxford University Press guidelines were originally drafted as a single broadsheet page by Horace Henry Hart, and were at the time (1893) the first guide of their type in English; they were gradually expanded and eventually published, first as Hart’s Rules, and in 2002 as part of The Oxford Manual of Style.

Comparable in authority and stature to The Chicago Manual of Style for published American English, the Oxford Manual is a fairly exhaustive standard for published British English that writers can turn to in the absence of specific guidance from their publishing house.

 

GoLocalise is the english’s leading voice over agency offering English voice-over, english translations to any language in the world, among other services.

Listen to different accents of British English and American English accents.

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